Positive behaviour recognition supports children’s recovery

Challenging Heights —  March 15, 2017

After we conduct a rescue and the children are brought to the Challenging Heights Hovde House rehabilitation shelter, they are interviewed about their experiences while working on Lake Volta. Nearly all of them report having been physically and verbally abused, with many of them bearing scars on their bodies as testaments to the beatings they endured. Indeed, corporal punishment at home and in schools is widespread throughout Ghana.

Because of these experiences and the behaviour modelled to them, the children often come to us having learned a number of anti-social behaviours. Fighting, insulting others, quarrelling and general disrespect are how many of the boys and girls have learned how to interact with each other and with adults. We know that these experiences are a part of the greater trauma that the children experienced, and that in order to help assist and facilitate their healing, we must not repeat this treatment of them. Additionally, through our modelling, we’re able to help them to learn acceptable and appropriate behaviours.

At the shelter, the shelter team observes the children and completes a weekly behaviour chart. Good behaviours, such as doing their chores, maintaining self-control when experiencing conflict with others, following instructions, helping others and behaving well in class receive points. Negative behaviours, like lying, cursing and insulting, teasing, fighting, damaging property or stealing all result in deducted points. The total possible number of points each week is 20, and if the child receives 15 points or more, they receive an award at the weekly award ceremony.

In the exit interviews of children who are ready for reintegration, nearly all of them comment that one of the most important things they learned in their time at the shelter was how to behave well. Many of them remark that when the arrived, they used to insult others and not listen to adults, that they had a quick temper and would fight easily. Receiving the weekly awards is a highlight for many of the children in the shelter, and their growth in their time here is a testament not only to the staff at the shelter, but to the anti-corporal punishment policy in place.